What Are Human Rights?

 Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible.

Universal human rights are often expressed and guaranteed by law, in the forms of treaties, customary international law , general principles and other sources of international law. International human rights law lays down obligations of Governments to act in certain ways or to refrain from certain acts, in order to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms of individuals or groups.

Universal and inalienable

The principle of universality of human rights is the cornerstone of international human rights law. This principle, as first emphasized in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights in 1948, has been reiterated in numerous international human rights conventions, declarations, and resolutions. The 1993 Vienna World Conference on Human Rights, for example, noted that it is the duty of States to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems.

All States have ratified at least one, and 80% of States have ratified four or more, of the core human rights treaties, reflecting consent of States which creates legal obligations for them and giving concrete expression to universality. Some fundamental human rights norms enjoy universal protection by customary international law across all boundaries and civilizations.

Human rights are inalienable. They should not be taken away, except in specific situations and according to due process. For example, the right to liberty may be restricted if a person is found guilty of a crime by a court of law.

Interdependent and indivisible

All human rights are indivisible, whether they are civil and political rights, such as the right to life, equality before the law and freedom of expression; economic, social and cultural rights, such as the rights to work, social security and education , or collective rights, such as the rights to development and self-determination, are indivisible, interrelated and interdependent. The improvement of one right facilitates advancement of the others. Likewise, the deprivation of one right adversely affects the others.  

Equal and non-discriminatory

UNICEF photoNon-discrimination is a cross-cutting principle in international human rights law. The principle is present in all the major human rights treaties and provides the central theme of some of international human rights conventions such as the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.  

The principle applies to everyone in relation to all human rights and freedoms and it prohibits discrimination on the basis of a list of non-exhaustive categories such as sex, race, colour and so on. The principle of non-discrimination is complemented by the principle of equality, as stated in Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: ?All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.?

Both Rights and Obligations

 Human rights entail both rights and obligations. States assume obligations and duties under international law to respect, to protect and to fulfill human rights. The obligation to respect means that States must refrain from interfering with or curtailing the enjoyment of human rights. The obligation to protect requires States to protect individuals and groups against human rights abuses. The obligation to fulfill means that States must take positive action to facilitate the enjoyment of basic human rights. At the individual level, while we are entitled our human rights, we should also respect the human rights of others.

 

Human Rights Learning

Human rights learning/education is an integral part of the right to education and is increasingly gaining recognition as a human right in itself. Knowledge of rights and freedoms is considered a fundamental tool to guarantee respect for the rights of all. UNESCO?s work in human rights education is guided by the World Program for Human Rights Education.

Education should encompass values such as peace, non-discrimination, equality, justice, non-violence, tolerance and respect for human dignity. Quality education based on a human rights approach means that rights are implemented throughout the whole education system and in all learning environments.

"Human Affect" AD HOC UNIT: Human Rights Learning Through Art, Athletics and Science

HUMAN RIGHTS LEARNING THROUGH ART, ATHLETICS and SCIENCE, (HRLTAAS) was passed through the Ethiopian World Federation Council in 2006/2007 as the Human Rights foundation for promotion of the International organizations constitutional Human Rights Mission Component. 

Sandra Nelson - Zongo, the International President, Founded the HRLTAAS initiative and fought that it be established through the NGO's Constitutional International Unit Body as and AD HOC UNIT so that the initiative could include members from all Nationalities, Jurisdictions, Countries, Member States, Sovereign, etc. to assist in finding responsible solutions that plague the Human Planet.

Mrs. Zongo wrote a play titled "Human Affect" which is the initiatives policy that utilizes theatre, dance, song, lyrics, visual art, poetry, written word, graffiti art and martial arts which she trademarked as "Policy in Action".  This innovative Policy is Active and each the "Human Affect" is performed the theatrical musical play advocates for the Human Rights of all through is artistic performance.

Policy In Action

POLICY IN ACTION states that Human Rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever ones nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status.  We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination.  These civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible.

 

HUMAN AFFECT – THE PLAY AND ITS NATURE

The original script, written by Sandra “Akiwa Gizzel” Nelson, titled Human Affect is a fictional setting based on stories which emulate Human Rights Concerns that echo around the world throughout all continents.

The stories which encompass Human Affect speak on Human Rights Concerns in the areas of…

1.  Domestic Abuse/Violence Against Women

2.  Economic,Social, Environmental and Ecological Sustainability/Human Right to have Sustainable food, clothing, shelter and clean/healthy water

3.  Racism/Tolerance

4.  Human Trafficking /Trading and Selling Young Girls and Boys for the Sex Trade

5.  Child Soldiers In Combat/Child Rights

6.  Homelessness/Eradication of Poverty

7.  HIV/AIDS and other Diseases

8.  Climate Change in the midst of Environment Destruction/Natural Disasters

9.   Indigenous Issues Awareness, Preservation and Promotion/Sovereign Rights

10. Women’s Birth Health/Rights of the Child (Water as a Human Right)

 Human Rights Learning Through the Art of Theatre 

Carries several components that are essential tools which can be utilized in correcting many social, economic and environmental challenges affecting the international human population.




 


 

International Human Rights Law


Sphere at the Palais des Nations  in GenevaThe international human rights movement was strengthened when the United Nations General Assembly adopted of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) on 10 December 1948. Drafted as ‘a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations', the Declaration for the first time in human history spell out basic civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights that all human beings should enjoy. It has over time been widely accepted as the fundamental norms of human rights that everyone should respect and protect. The UDHR, together with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols, and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, form the so - called International Bill of Human Rights.

A series of international human rights treaties and other instruments adopted since 1945 have conferred legal form on inherent human rights and developed the body of international human rights. Other instruments have been adopted at the regional level reflecting the particular human rights concerns of the region and providing for specific mechanisms of protection. Most States have also adopted constitutions and other laws which formally protect basic human rights. While international treaties and customary law form the backbone of international human rights law other instruments, such as declarations, guidelines and principles adopted at the international level contribute to its understanding, implementation and development. Respect for human rights requires the establishment of the rule of law at the national and international levels.

International human rights law lays down obligations which States are bound to respect. By becoming parties to international treaties, States assume obligations and duties under international law to respect, to protect and to fulfil human rights. The obligation to respect means that States must refrain from interfering with or curtailing the enjoyment of human rights. The obligation to protect requires States to protect individuals and groups against human rights abuses. The obligation to fulfill means that States must take positive action to facilitate the enjoyment of basic human rights.

Through ratification of international human rights treaties, Governments undertake to put into place domestic measures and legislation compatible with their treaty obligations and duties. Where domestic legal proceedings fail to address human rights abuses, mechanisms and procedures for individual complaints or communications are available at the regional and international levels to help ensure that international human rights standards are indeed respected, implemented, and enforced at the local level.