Post Rio + 20 Human Rights and Development

"Navi Pillay", UN High Commissioner for Human Rights

"The litmus test of development is the degree to which any strategies and interventions satisfy the legitimate demands of the people for freedom from fear and want, for a voice in their own societies, and for a life of dignity.

Human rights are essential to achieving and sustaining development. The Millennium Declaration, adopted by all the world’s leaders in 2000 recognized the link between human rights and development. The UN General Assembly’s High-level Plenary Meeting on the MDGs in 2010 (The MDGs Summit) reaffirmed that common fundamental values, including freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, respect for all human rights, respect for nature and shared responsibility, are essential for achieving the MDGs. 


 
UN Commission on Sustainable Development                           Rio+20 Voluntary Commitments.

 The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) was an action-oriented

conference, where all stakeholders, including Major Groups, the UN System/IGOs, and Member States were invited to make commitments focusing on delivering  concrete results for sustainable development on a voluntary basis. All organizers of side events at Rio+20 were also strongly encouraged to register commitments as part of the outcomes of their side events. 

By the end of the Conference, over 700 voluntary commitments were announced and compiled into an online registry managed by the Rio+20 Secretariat,  initiating a new bottom-up approach towards the advancement of sustainable development. As mandated by the Conference outcome, this registry of commitments will continue to welcome registrations and to deliver transparent and accessible information to the follow-up process.   All commitments to be registered should be specific, measurable, funded, new (or extension of  an existing commitment) and should cover at least one of the below sustainable development areas. In order to facilitate periodic reporting on progress of implementation, it is important that at least one tangible deliverable is specified, along with  the estimated timeline for completion.  Resources devoted to the delivery of commitments should also be specified, including financing, staff or technical expertise, and in-kind contribution. Please refer to the attached screenshots for further information. Kindly note that the United Nations reserve full rights to review the information submitted for accuracy and relevance to sustainable development. Sustainable Development Areas

Water

Mountains

Gender Equality

Sustainable Cities

Poverty Eradication

Sustainable Transport

Sustainability Management

Green Jobs and Social Inclusion

Natural Disaster Preparedness

Sustainable Consumption and Production

Biodiversity, Forests and other Ecosystems

Education 

Climate Change 

Oceans and Seas, SIDS 

Sustainable Energy 

Chemicals and Waste 

SD Strategies and Policies  

Technology and Innovation 

SD economics, finance and trade 

Land Degradation and Desertification 

Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture 

Measuring SD progress (through indicators) 

Public awareness and communications on SD

conference, where all stakeholders, including Major Groups, the UN System/IGOs, and Member States were 
invited to make commitments focusing on delivering  concrete results for sustainable development on a 
voluntary basis. All organizers of side events at Rio+20 were also strongly encouraged to register commitments 
as part of the outcomes of their side events.  
By the end of the Conference, over 700 voluntary commitments were announced and compiled into an 
online registry managed by the Rio+20 Secretariat,  initiating a new bottom-up approach towards the 
advancement of sustainable development. As mandated by the Conference outcome, this registry of 
commitments will continue to welcome registrations and to deliver transparent and accessible information to the 
follow-up process.   
All commitments to be registered should be specific, measurable, funded, new (or extension of  an 
existing commitment) and should cover at least one of the below sustainable development areas. In order to 
facilitate periodic reporting on progress of implementation, it is important that at least one tangible deliverable
is specified, along with  the estimated timeline for completion.  Resources devoted to the delivery of 
commitments should also be specified, including financing, staff or technical expertise, and in-kind 
contribution. Please refer to the attached screenshots for further information. Kindly note that the United 
Nations reserve full rights to review the information submitted for accuracy and relevance to sustainable 
development. 
Sustainable Development Areas
Water 
Mountains 
Gender Equality 
Sustainable Cities 
Poverty Eradication 
Sustainable Transport 
Sustainability Management 
Green Jobs and Social Inclusion 
Natural Disaster Preparedness 
Sustainable Consumption and Production 
Biodiversity, Forests and other Ecosystems 
Education  
Climate Change  
Oceans and Seas, SIDS  
Sustainable Energy  
Chemicals and Waste  
SD Strategies and Policies   
Technology and Innovation  
SD economics, finance and trade  
Land Degradation and Desertification  
Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture  
Measuring SD progress (through indicators)  
Public awareness and communications on SD
The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) was an action-oriented 
conference, where all stakeholders, including Major Groups, the UN System/IGOs, and Member States were 
invited to make commitments focusing on delivering  concrete results for sustainable development on a 
voluntary basis. All organizers of side events at Rio+20 were also strongly encouraged to register commitments 
as part of the outcomes of their side events.  
By the end of the Conference, over 700 voluntary commitments were announced and compiled into an 
online registry managed by the Rio+20 Secretariat,  initiating a new bottom-up approach towards the 
advancement of sustainable development. As mandated by the Conference outcome, this registry of 
commitments will continue to welcome registrations and to deliver transparent and accessible information to the 
follow-up process.   
All commitments to be registered should be specific, measurable, funded, new (or extension of  an 
existing commitment) and should cover at least one of the below sustainable development areas. In order to 
facilitate periodic reporting on progress of implementation, it is important that at least one tangible deliverable
is specified, along with  the estimated timeline for completion.  Resources devoted to the delivery of 
commitments should also be specified, including financing, staff or technical expertise, and in-kind 
contribution. Please refer to the attached screenshots for further information. Kindly note that the United 
Nations reserve full rights to review the information submitted for accuracy and relevance to sustainable 
development. 
Sustainable Development Areas
Water 
Mountains 
Gender Equality 
Sustainable Cities 
Poverty Eradication 
Sustainable Transport 
Sustainability Management 
Green Jobs and Social Inclusion 
Natural Disaster Preparedness 
Sustainable Consumption and Production 
Biodiversity, Forests and other Ecosystems 
Education  
Climate Change  
Oceans and Seas, SIDS  
Sustainable Energy  
Chemicals and Waste  
SD Strategies and Policies   
Technology and Innovation  
SD economics, finance and trade  
Land Degradation and Desertification  
Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture  
Measuring SD progress (through indicators)  
Public awareness and communications on SD The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) was an action-oriented 
conference, where all stakeholders, including Major Groups, the UN System/IGOs, and Member States were 
invited to make commitments focusing on delivering  concrete results for sustainable development on a 
voluntary basis. All organizers of side events at Rio+20 were also strongly encouraged to register commitments 
as part of the outcomes of their side events.  
By the end of the Conference, over 700 voluntary commitments were announced and compiled into an 
online registry managed by the Rio+20 Secretariat,  initiating a new bottom-up approach towards the 
advancement of sustainable development. As mandated by the Conference outcome, this registry of 
commitments will continue to welcome registrations and to deliver transparent and accessible information to the 
follow-up process.   
All commitments to be registered should be specific, measurable, funded, new (or extension of  an 
existing commitment) and should cover at least one of the below sustainable development areas. In order to 
facilitate periodic reporting on progress of implementation, it is important that at least one tangible deliverable
is specified, along with  the estimated timeline for completion.  Resources devoted to the delivery of 
commitments should also be specified, including financing, staff or technical expertise, and in-kind 
contribution. Please refer to the attached screenshots for further information. Kindly note that the United 
Nations reserve full rights to review the information submitted for accuracy and relevance to sustainable 
development. 
Sustainable Development Areas
Water 
Mountains 
Gender Equality 
Sustainable Cities 
Poverty Eradication 
Sustainable Transport 
Sustainability Management 
Green Jobs and Social Inclusion 
Natural Disaster Preparedness 
Sustainable Consumption and Production 
Biodiversity, Forests and other Ecosystems 
Education  
Climate Change  
Oceans and Seas, SIDS  
Sustainable Energy  
Chemicals and Waste  
SD Strategies and Policies   
Technology and Innovation  
SD economics, finance and trade  
Land Degradation and Desertification  
Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture  
Measuring SD progress (through indicators)  
Public awareness and communications on SD

 

Partner with YEWMBA and together will reach the goal of our Voluntary Commitment. 

Registry of Commitments for Sustainable Development 
www.uncsd2012.org/commit
The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) was an action-oriented 
conference, where all stakeholders, including Major Groups, the UN System/IGOs, and Member States were 
invited to make commitments focusing on delivering  concrete results for sustainable development on a 
voluntary basis. All organizers of side events at Rio+20 were also strongly encouraged to register commitments 
as part of the outcomes of their side events.  
By the end of the Conference, over 700 voluntary commitments were announced and compiled into an 
online registry managed by the Rio+20 Secretariat,  initiating a new bottom-up approach towards the 
advancement of sustainable development. As mandated by the Conference outcome, this registry of 
commitments will continue to welcome registrations and to deliver transparent and accessible information to the 
follow-up process.   
All commitments to be registered should be specific, measurable, funded, new (or extension of  an 
existing commitment) and should cover at least one of the below sustainable development areas. In order to 
facilitate periodic reporting on progress of implementation, it is important that at least one tangible deliverable
is specified, along with  the estimated timeline for completion.  Resources devoted to the delivery of 
commitments should also be specified, including financing, staff or technical expertise, and in-kind 
contribution. Please refer to the attached screenshots for further information. Kindly note that the United 
Nations reserve full rights to review the information submitted for accuracy and relevance to sustainable 
development. 
Sustainable Development Areas
Water 
Mountains 
Gender Equality 
Sustainable Cities 
Poverty Eradication 
Sustainable Transport 
Sustainability Management 
Green Jobs and Social Inclusion 
Natural Disaster Preparedness 
Sustainable Consumption and Production 
Biodiversity, Forests and other Ecosystems 
Education  
Climate Change  
Oceans and Seas, SIDS  
Sustainable Energy  
Chemicals and Waste  
SD Strategies and Policies   
Technology and Innovation  
SD economics, finance and trade  
Land Degradation and Desertification  
Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture  
Measuring SD progress (through indicators)  
Public awareness and communications on SD 

UN Charter "Peace and Security"

United Nations is an international organization whose stated aims are facilitating cooperation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress, human rights, and achievement of world peace. The UN was founded in 1945 after World War II to replace the League of Nations, to stop wars between countries, and to provide a platform for dialogue. It contains multiple subsidiary organizations to carry out its missions.

There are currently 192 member states, including nearly every sovereign state in the world. From its offices around the world, the UN and its specialized agencies decide on substantive and administrative issues in regular meetings held throughout the year. The organization has six principal organs: the General Assembly (the main deliberative assembly); the Security Council (for deciding certain resolutions for peace and security); the Economic and Social Council (for assisting in promoting international economic and social cooperation and development); the Secretariat (for providing studies, information, and facilities needed by the UN); the International Court of Justice (the primary judicial organ); and the United Nations Trusteeship Council (which is currently inactive). Other prominent UN System agencies include the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). The UN's most visible public figure is the Secretary-General, currently Ban Ki-moon of South Korea, who attained the post in 2007. The organization is financed from assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states, and has six official languages: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, Russian, and Spanish.